A Trip To Reggio Di Calabria

This was a view from the conference’s break area — that’s the Mediterranean and Sicily in the distance.

I recently went to Reggio Di Calabria, a city in southern Italy, to present to present a paper I wrote at a workshop / conference. The trip was good, and (predictably, for Southern Italy in August) quite hot.

I spent an afternoon and evening in Rome before taking a train south to Reggio Calabria. While in Rome, I did a little bit of sightseeing and visited the National Gallery of Ancient Art, ate at some local cafes, and tried to nap away the jetlag. Once in Reggio Calabria, I:

  1. Learned about the custom of leaving hotel keys at the front desk;
  2. Tried, without success, to figure out if I actually could drink the tapwater: no one would say it was unsafe, but also everyone recommended just buying bottled water;
  3. Then tried, with some success, to figure out the meanings of the different types of bottled water, or at least “oligomineral” water;
  4. Visited the National Museum of Magna Graecia, which was way more impressive than I had even hoped for; and
  5. Was totally blown away by the horizon every time I looked at it. The Mediterranean with Sicily in the background consistently looked like a postcard.

The conference I was at also had an organized outing to the town of Scilla, where we walked through the fishing village / district Chianalea and climbed to the top of the ancient Castello Ruffo.

The only other notable event was getting my debit card skimmed at an ATM in Rome on my return trip, although I wouldn’t find out about that for a couple of weeks. Despite that, it was a great trip — I watched a number of really interesting talks, met great people, and of course the food (especially the gelato!) and scenery were just incredible.

Outdoors in Rome

National Gallery of Ancient Art

Reggio Di Calabria

Scilla, Italy

National Museum of Magna Graecia

 

A sign directing travelers in Rome’s Leonardo da Vinci to the international check-in

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